Tag Archives: 4-6-0 steam locomotive

The Music Man 1962

Warner Brothers

One of my favorite musicals from the days of yore featured a short, but eclectic train scene immediately after the opening credits. In the studio, filmmakers utilized a cutaway side view of an old time railroad coach (the movie takes place in 1912). Along with regular conversation, the song, “Rock Island” is performed by the traveling salesmen. This implies a ride on the Rock Island Railroad or a visit to Rock Island, Illinois, neither of which actually happens.

In addition, we are treated to small snippets of Oahu Railway & Land Company locomotive #85 (seen below) which is presumed to be the motive power for the train. During filming, OR&LC #85 was located at Travel Town in Los Angeles’ Griffith Park.

Let’s take a trip from Brighton, Illinois to River City, Iowa by train and meet Professor Harold Hill! (played by Robert Preston).

This must have been one of the last pictures taken of OR&LC #85 under steam as it dropped its fires for good in 1961. Check out that funky running gear on the 4-6-0! This is what is known as an “outside frame” steam locomotive. Other examples of outside frame engines can be found on the former Rio Grande narrow gauge lines in Colorado.

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Race for a Life 1913

Keystone Film Company

This 108 year old movie was a lot of fun to research and learn about. Just 13 minutes in length, Race for a Life tells the tale of a fair maiden chained to the railroad tracks by a spurned villain and cad in the best melodramatic, indeed, over-the-top fashion.

The star of the show was AT&SF #492, a 4-6-0 oil-burning, passenger steam engine built by the Rhode Island Locomotive Works in 1900.

Filmed along the Santa Fe Railway in and around Inglewood, California, I was actually able to obtain a picture of the depot used in filming and AT&SF #492 in more contemporary times.

There’s even an early scene of what became known as the “Keystone Kops” pedaling along furiously to the rescue on a railroad handcar. C’mon, let’s take a closer look at this ancient, silent flicker.

Damsel-in-distress Mabel Normand breaks the fourth wall and stares into the camera as she remains firmly affixed to the right-of-way. Poor Mabel. Will no one save her?

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A Ticket to Tomahawk 1950

20th Century Fox

I actually reviewed Tomahawk back in the early days of Obscure Train Movies — It just wasn’t much of a review. Today, I hope to do a better job revisiting A Ticket To Tomahawk in all its Technicolor glory. This is the movie that put the Durango and Silverton D&RGW narrow gauge line on the map. Not only did people come to ride the little train in Southwestern Colorado, moviemakers returned to film other pictures too numerous to list here.

The star of the show is Rio Grande Southern #20, 4-6-0 3-foot narrow gauge steam locomotive. #20 was originally built for the Florence and Cripple Creek Railroad in 1899 by Schenectady Locomotive Works (Alco). For its movie appearance, RGS #20 was decorated in a colorful paint scheme and named “Emma Sweeny” as Tomahawk & Western Railroad #1.

Just look at all that detail! Red and gold paint accentuates the green Emma Sweeny signboard. Antlers on the headlight box and white “extra train” flags flapping in the breeze. In another view, Emma poses in good light near Silverton.

Apologies for the fuzzy screen caps. AFAIK, Fox never released Tomahawk on DVD, so I had to make do with an aftermarket product.

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